March B3: We Can All Be Brave

Whether it is standing up to spooky monsters in the dark, tackling a big goal or facing real-life fears, we all need to be brave sometimes. Often all it takes to remind us of this is a friend to be brave by our side.

Join us in the Butler Center on March 28, 2018, from 5:30-7:00 p.m. to discuss the following books about bravery in all its forms.

Picture Books:

Nothing Can Frighten a Bear by Elizabeth Dale, illus. by Paula Metcalf (Nosy Crow, 2018)

Nothing Can Frighten a bear

Voices from the Underground Railroad by Kay Winters, illus. by Larry Day (Dial Books for Young Readers, 2018)

voices from the underground railroad

Children’s Non-Fiction:

Marley Dias Gets It Done: And So Can You! by Marley Dias (Scholastic Press, 2018)

marley dias

Teen Fiction:

All We Can Do is Wait by Richard Lawson (Razorbill/Penguin Random House, 2018)

all we can do is wait

B3 is Back for 2018!

Help us celebrate the return of Butler Book Banter at our first gathering of the year!


All are welcome!

What & Why:

“I Heart Butler” – meet and greet our new curator, discuss some LOVELY new books, and tell us what you LOVE about the Butler Center events past and present!


Wednesday, February 21st at 5:30 p.m.


Butler Children’s Literature Center
Rebecca Crown Library, Room 214
Dominican University Main Campus
7900 West Division Street
River Forest, IL 60305

See you there!

2018 Butler Lecture – Registration Now Open!

The Butler Children’s Literature Center is excited to welcome Andrea Davis Pinkney as our 2018 Butler Lecturer.


Andrea Davis Pinkney is a children’s book editor and New York Times-bestselling author with a number of award-winning books to her name, including Hand in Hand: Ten Black Men Who Changed America (2012) for which she received the Coretta Scott King Author Award; picture-book biographies of major figures such as Duke Ellington(1998), Ella Fitzgerald (2002), and Alan Ailey (1995); and Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down (2010), which won the Anne Izard Storytellers’ Choice Award. Many of her books are illustrated by her husband Brian Pinkney, who is also an award-winning children’s book creator in his own right. Their upcoming book together, Martin Rising: Requiem for a King, features Andrea’s poetic requiem accompanied by Brian’s lyrical and colorful artwork, will be published in January 2018.

The Butler Lecture is free and open to the public, with registration. For more information and to register, click here.

Butler Center Book Sale

It’s that time of year again!

Join the Butler Children’s Literature Center for its annual book sale next Thursday, December 14th from 10 am to 6 pm.

Find us in the Butler Center (Rebecca Crown Library, Room 214) with cookies, cider, expert recommendations, and BOOKS!

If you’re looking to build your book collection, buy presents for your loved ones (or yourself!), or want to check out popular books from 2017, you won’t want to miss this opportunity!

Hardcovers are being sold for $5 each, while paperbacks are selling for $2.

Hope to see you there!


Butler Children’s Literature Center Book Sale

Thursday, December 14

10 am – 6 pm

Crown 214


Finding Their Way Home: A Review of Refugee by Alan Gratz

Told in three separate yet connected stories, Refugee is a novel of perseverance and commitment to who you are in the face of persecution.

refugeeJosef is fleeing from 1930s Nazi Germany and the threat of concentration camps with his parents and sister. Isabel, her parents, and her neighbors use a makeshift raft to escape Cuba in 1994, during the unrest of Castro’s regime. Mahmoud, along with his parents and younger siblings, leave the violence of war in Syria in 2015, traveling through Europe as they search for a safer place to live. Though the details of their stories are unique, Josef, Isabel, and Mahmoud share more similarities than just their situations.

The attention given to creating characters with heart and conviction is engaging, while the conflicts each protagonist faces ensure none of their individual stories get stuck in the emotion of the book as a whole. Refugee tells an important story, and does so without preaching or sensationalizing the experiences of refugees past and present. Maps and an author’s note highlight the reality of Josef, Isabel, and Mahmoud’s stories and show the readers how they can help with relief efforts.

Mock Belpré Results

The Butler Children’s Literature Center’s Mock Pura Belpré Award results are in!


The Medal winner for text is The Epic Fail of Arturo Zamora by Pablo Cartaya (Viking, 2017).

Two Honor Books for text were named: Forest World by Margarita Engle (Simon and Schuster/Atheneum, 2017) and Stef Soto Taco Queen by Jennifer Torres (Little, Brown, 2017).

The Medal winner for illustration is Bravo! Poems about Amazing Hispanics, illustrated by Rafael López, written by Margarita Engle (Holt, 2017).

Two Honor Books for illustration were named: Lucía the Luchadora, illustrated by Alyssa Bermudez, written by Cynthia Leonor Garza (POW!, 2017) and Miguel’s Brave Knight: Young Cervantes and His Dream of Don Quixote, illustrated by Raúl Colón, written by Margarita Engle.

Congratulations to tonight’s winners and we look forward to seeing the REAL results on Monday, February 12, 2018 during the American Library Association’s Midwinter Meeting in Denver, Colorado.


We’re Not Afraid! Two Not-Too-Scary Stories

In the spirit of Halloween, we’d like to share two new picture books with characters who rethink their requests for scary stories.

i want to be in a scary storyLittle Monster is confident he wants to be in a scary story, until he’s stuck in the middle of one. Witches, ghosts, and spooky houses? “Golly Gosh!” and “Jeepers Creepers!” he says. Little Monster doesn’t want to be scared; he wants to do the scaring! The narrator (indicated on the page with black text, where Little Monster’s words are purple) acquiesces, putting Little Monster in charge of the upcoming frights. Is Little Monster ready to scare? With charming dialogue and just enough forewarning for what the next page holds, I Want to Be in a Scary Story will delight any child who wants to be in a story – on their own terms.

too scary story

Parents who’ve struggled to satisfy competing requests will recognize Papa’s burden in The Too-Scary Story. Grace and Walter settle in for a bedtime story, but they can’t agree on how scary it should be. The dark forest setting is “too scary” for Walter, so Papa introduces the “twinkling lights” of fireflies. But that’s not scary enough for Grace! Back and forth the story goes, scary to safe, until Walter and Grace agree – the story is too scary! Luckily, Grace has her magic wand, and Papa is never too far away to bring the story back to safety. Murguia’s mixed media illustrations follow the alternating moods of the text and complete this bedtime adventure.