April B3: Immigration Stories

These days, it’s more important than ever for us to share stories about immigration with the young readers we serve; both for the sake of immigrant kids in our communities, and to encourage understanding among others of these kids’ experiences.

Join us on April 5, 2017 in the Butler Center from 5:30-7:00 (books & snacks out at 5:30; discussion from 6-7) to discuss the following list of recently published books with an immigration theme, from picture books to children’s fiction to teen fiction. We’re focusing on fiction this time; we know there are lots of excellent informational books too. You may remember the Butler Center’s “Big Read” bibliography from last year; this month’s list complements the selections recommended there.

PICTURE BOOKS

CallingtheWaterDrum
Calling the Water Drum
by LaTisha Redding, illus. by Aaron Boyd (Lee & Low, 2016)

PieceofHome
A Piece of Home
by Jeri Watts, illus. by Hyewon Yum (Candlewick, 2016)

CHILDREN’S FICTION

LongPitchHome
A Long Pitch Home
by Natalie Dias Lorenzi (Charlesbridge, 2016)

OnlyRoad.jpeg
The Only Road
by Alexandra Diaz (Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman, 2016)

TEEN FICTION

GirlMansUp.jpeg
Girl Mans Up
by M-E Girard (HarperTeen, 2016)

Watched
Watched
by Marina Budhos (Random/Wendy Lamb, 2016)

Mock CaldeNott Medal and Honors

Well, we did it! We did in just 90 minutes what it takes “real” committees a whole year to do (ha ha, just kidding). But we DID discuss and vote on a Butler’s dozen (13) titles not eligible for the Caldecott. Other than the eligibility, we stuck with all the other criteria and processes, including balloting and determining our Medal winner and Honor Books.

Our Mock CaldeNott Medal winner is Armstrong: The Adventurous Journey of a Mouse to the Moon by Torben Kuhlmann (North-South)

armstrong

Our “committee” named two Mock CaldeNott Honor Books:

Gordon & Tapir by Sebastian Meschenmoser (North-South)

gordonandtapir

The Journey by Francesca Sanna (Flying Eye)

journey

Thanks to guest co-moderator Keary Bramwell and all our indefatigable committee “members!” Stay tuned for more Mocks coming up…..

Mock CaldeNott – February 1, 2017

We’re thrilled to bring back the popular Mock CaldeNott for the first Butler Book Banter of 2017, in which we get together just after the REAL Youth Media Awards to deliberate about terrific books that weren’t discussed in the Caldecott Committee, not because they aren’t worthy, but because they’re outside the scope of the real-life award. We’re talking about books published in other countries and/or illustrated by people who are not US citizens or residents. All the books on our list were published in 2016, though.

So, as soon as we’ve finished Monday-morning quarterbacking the actual award winner selections, let’s dig into something a little different! Join us here in the Butler Center from 5:30-7:30 (books and snacks out at 5:30, discussion from 6-7, voting from 7-7:30).

Special thanks to guest co-moderator Keary Bramwell, who spurred us to do this again and did yeoman’s work in helping develop the discussion list. See you on February first!

Are You an Echo? The Lost Poetry of Misuzu Kaneko by David Jacobson, illustrated by Toshikado Hajiri (Chin Music)

Armstrong: The Adventurous Journey of a Mouse to the Moon by Torben Kuhlmann (North-South)

Beach Baby by Laurie Elmquist, illus. by Elly McKay (Orca)

The Bus Ride by Marianne Dubuc (Kids Can)

A Child of Books by Oliver Jeffers and Sam Winston (Candlewick)

Circle by Jeannie Baker (Candlewick)

Gordon & Tapir by Sebastian Meschenmoser (North-South)

The Journey by Francesca Sanna (Flying Eye)

King Baby by Kate Beaton (Scholastic/Arthur A. Levine)

Look Up! by Jung Jin-Ho (Holiday)

Over the Ocean by Taro Gomi (Chronicle)

Stepping Stones: A Refugee Family’s Journey by Margriet Ruurs, illus. by Nizar Badr (Orca)

When Green Becomes Tomatoes: Poems for All Seasons by Julie Fogliano, illus. by Julie Morstad (Roaring Brook/Neal Porter)

 

At the Core of Librarianship

by Diane Foote, Hal Patnott, and Alena Rivers

Collaboration. Excellence. Inclusiveness. Innovation. Integrity and respect. Leadership. Responsiveness.

These are the core values of children’s librarianship, as articulated by our professional association, ALSC. These values offer all of us a framework for our philosophy, goals, and actions; particularly today, but really, every day. The children we serve deserve all of our efforts to collaborate with them, their families, and our communities; they deserve the very best in books and media. All children deserve to be included in the radical promise of universal access to information and education. Young people deserve our best new ideas. All children deserve to be treated with integrity and respect. Young people deserve our leadership in modeling and fostering all of these values, and young people need us to respond to their needs, and the needs of a changing society.

We can do all these things. It is easier and more effective to do all of these things if we do them together (collaboration). Here in the Butler Center, we feel we do these things naturally, organically, and in the course of our daily work. However, sometimes it becomes important to be more intentional and disciplined about beliefs we may take for granted, or assume are universally shared. Today and going forward (leadership), we are going to intentionally focus on these values through the lens of children’s literature. We encourage all of you to talk about these values with the children you serve, and we will make recommendations for books to use as discussion anchors. The beauty of children’s books is that the best of them are compellingly written and effectively illustrated (excellence); we’ll showcase ones here that exemplify these values without didacticism, with appeal to kids.

Our commitment to young people doesn’t stop as they grow up. The mission of young adult librarianship, as articulated by YALSA, keeps us focused: “Our mission is to support library staff in alleviating the challenges teens face, and in putting all teens ‒ especially those with the greatest needs ‒ on the path to successful and fulfilling lives.”

Stay tuned in this space, and join us in moving forward with inclusiveness, integrity and respect. Young people deserve nothing less.

Butler Book Banter 10/26/16

It’s nearly October again, and it’s time to announce our discussion titles for our upcoming Butler Book Banter on Wednesday, 10/26/16 “Spooky YA (and Tween).” We listened to you and added some tween titles to the YA roster this time! Be prepared to be scared:

The Inn Between
The Inn Between
by Marina Cohen (Roaring Brook, 2016)

 

killingjar
The Killing Jar
by Jennifer Bosworth (Farrar Straus Giroux, 2016)

 

LastBogler.jpg


The Last Bogler
by Catherine Jinks (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016)

 

TeenFrankenstein.jpg
Teen Frankenstein
by Chandler Baker (Feiwel and Friends, 2016)


Bonus reading!
We’re starting to prepare for Holly Black’s 2017 Butler Lecture, and her oeuvre fits nicely with B3 this month. Revisit Newbery Honor Doll Bones (Simon & Schuster, 2013) or teen faves The Coldest Girl in Coldtown (Little, Brown, 2013) and The Darkest Part of the Forest (Little, Brown, 2015).

Whether you’ve read all, some, or none, join us for a spooky time on October 26. Books and snacks will be out at 5:30 and we’ll discuss from 6-7. Boo!

 

May B3: Graphic Novels

Graphic novels are more popular than ever! We could probably run Butler Book Banters weekly, all year round, to have enough time to really discuss all the fabulous selections out there (hmmm…..). Fiction, nonfiction, books for kids, books for teens, fantasy, history, and then some; pretty much any genre you can think of is now available in a graphic or comic format.

This is great news for kids who may not learn to read in the traditional way but who gravitate toward this highly-visual medium; not such great news for people who think all kids need to learn to read in the same old way. Frankly, it’s great news for anyone who loves excellent text, excellent art, and excellent interplay between the two.

Join us in the Butler Center on Wednesday, May 18 from 6:00-7:00 to discuss this selection of graphic novels, when we’ll welcome Keary Bramwell, youth collection librarian at Mount Prospect Public Library, as our guest moderator.

Baba Yaga’s Assistant by Marika McCoola, illus. by Emily Carroll (Candlewick, 2015)
Child Soldier by Michel Chikwanine and Jessica Dee Humphreys, illus. by Claudia Davila (Kids Can, 2015)
Honor Girl by Maggie Thrash (Candlewick, 2015)
Only Child by Guojing (Schwartz & Wade, 2015)

April B3: Poetry Open Call

April is National Poetry Month, and here at the Butler Center we’re looking forward to celebrating at the April 20 Butler Book Banter (B3) with a Poetry Open Call. Bring your favorite book of poetry for youth (ages 0-18; backlist or new; Myra Cohn Livingston, Jack Prelutsky, and everything in between; or books about poetry or poets) and share it with the group.

We’ll share some of our favorites too, from our examination collection as well as our historical collections, including the following:

Bronzeville Boys and Girls by Gwendolyn Brooks, illus. by Faith Ringgold (HarperCollins/Amistad, 2007) from the Effie Lee Morris Collection

Daniel Finds a Poem by Micha Archer (Penguin/Nancy Paulsen, 2016)

Full Cicada Moon by Marilyn Hilton (Dial, 2015)

Winter Bees & Other Poems of the Cold by Joyce Sidman, illus. by Rick Allen (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2015)

Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty by Christine Heppermann (Greenwillow, 2014)

We’ll meet Wednesday, April 20 from 6-7 p.m. and refreshments will be served (no poisoned apples, we promise). No need to RSVP, although if you’d like to tell us you’re coming please do at butler@dom.edu. Happy reading!