Who’s Ready for School to Start?

Back-to-school butterflies? First day jitters? The newest academics among us will appreciate these sweet, silly, and giggle-worthy introductions to just who and what awaits them in the classroom. This brand new class of back-to-school picture books to will ease the way for the little humans in your library, classroom, or living room as all get ready for the first day of school.

 

Bunnys book clubBunny’s Book Club Goes to School
By Annie Silvestro, illustrated by Tatjana Mai-Wyss
Penguin Random House, June 2019

Josie is worried about making friends at school, but her book-club buddy Bunny can help—he’ll just be her school friend too. As the book club animals search the school for Josie, they’ll introduce kids to all the fun places waiting for them at school. Sweet illustrations complement this gentle story of friendship, empathy, and support.

 

clothes line cluesClothesline Clues to the First Day of School
By Katheryn Heling and Deborah Hembrook, illustrated by Andy Robert Davies
Charlesbridge, June 2019

It’s a laundry basket inspired guessing game in this guide to all the new people excited to meet you at school. A silly rhyme will help set expectations and turn anxiety to anticipation about the first day of school.

 

i will be fierceI Will Be Fierce
By Bea Birdsong, illustrated by Nidhi Chanani
MacMillan, April 2019

While not strictly a back-to-school-themed book, it follows this fierce little girl to school and back and through all the adventures in between. Brightly colored and boldly written, this is a great illustration of how a little confidence can go a long way on a big (first) day at school.

 

 

if animals went to schoolIf Animals Went to School
By Ann Whitford Paul, Illustrated by David Walker
Farrar, Straus and Giroux, May 2019

Beaver might not want to go to school, but after a day of music, learning, and his fun with his friends, he doesn’t want to go home. A perfectly inspirational story for the tiny human determined NOT to go to school!

 

king of kindergartenThe King of Kindergarten
By Derrick Barnes, illustrated by Vanessa Brantley Newton
Penguin Random House, July 2019

An exuberant and imaginative walkthrough of the first day of school! Barnes’ pacing is just right for introducing a new routine and finding the fun in what could be a scary first day.

 

The smell of freshly sharpened pencils is in the air—Happy Back-to-School season, friends!

 

 

 

 

A Cool and Sweet Summer Treat: A Review of My Life as an Ice Cream Sandwich

my life as an ice cream sandwich

My Life as an Ice Cream Sandwich
Ibi Zoboi
Penguin Random House, August 2019
Grades 5 and up

 My Life as an Ice Cream Sandwich, by National Book Award Finalist Ibi Zoboi, explores the imaginative world of Ebony-Grace Norfleet. While Ebony goes to Harlem to live with her father during the summer of 1984, her mother helps Ebony’s beloved grandfather back home. Her grandfather was a former NASA engineer, one of the first to be integrated into the NASA program in the 1960s. Ebony has followed in his footsteps with her fascination with space, spaceships, and science fiction. As the summer progresses, Ebony tries to adjust to big city life, a totally different world for her, coming from Huntsville, Alabama. From the start, readers will feel pulled into Ebony’s world, the sounds and excitement of New York City, and the 1980s.

Ebony battles the struggles in her life by seeing and experiencing everything as science fiction (Star Trek, Star Wars, and Wonder Woman). She then relates these challenges to the adventures she had with her grandfather (Sonic Boom, Captain Fleet, and many more) back home. It’s a summer of change for Ebony as she learns to make new friends and tries to fit in. She finds a new love and respect for her father and her roots, and she gains more self-awareness. Ebony discovers she can trust others, and most importantly of all, she learns to believe in herself. By summer’s end, Ebony realizes that she has other special people in her life besides her grandfather and that no matter what, his love will always be with her.

Zoboi’s use of space as a metaphor is effective and expertly crafted, drawing the reader more deeply into Ebony’s story. Her voice is exceptional, heartfelt, and stunning. Zoboi paints a setting that is real, palpable, and rich with imagery. She captures what it means to be at crossroads – the time when childhood and young adulthood eclipse, where dreams and reality clash, and when learning to let go is often the hardest thing of all, but a necessary part of growing up. My Life as an Ice Cream Sandwich is a beautifully rendered story of identity, family, friendship, loss, and acceptance.

 

Many thanks to local author, SCBWI-IL member, and guest reviewer, Elizabeth Brown. Brown is the author of Dancing Through Fields of Color: The Story of Helen Frankenthaler, illustrated by Aimee Sicuro, (Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2019) – a Junior Library Guild Selection. She has additional forthcoming picture books to release soon. Ms. Brown holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Goddard College, and she is represented by Sean McCarthy Literary Agency.

 

 

Pride Month Book List!

June is Pride Month! The LGBTQIA+ experience is vast, no one book can define what the experience is like for any one person. With the political climate pushing for policies that would deny those who fall within the LGBTQIA+ umbrella rights, it can be comforting to read books that extol the LGBTQIA+ experience. To celebrate Pride, we would like to share with you some of our favorite LGBTQIA+ books that have come out so far this year. This is by no means a comprehensive list of all the LGBTQIA+ books that have come out this year, but it is a start for those who wish to read more books with LGBTQIA+ protagonists.

Happy reading everyone!

61auCUPW94L._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_It Feels Good to be Yourself: A Book About Gender Identity
Theresa Thorn
Illustrated by Noah Grigni
Henry Holt and Company, June 4 2019
Ages Pre K-8

Ruthie is a Trans girl; when she was born people thought that she was a boy but she is actually a girl. When Ruthie was five years old, she corrected her family, telling them that she was a girl and not a boy like they thought. Ruthie has a gender fluid friend named Alex, and a non-binary friend named JJ. Ruthie’s brother Xavier is cisgender. Even though they all have different gender identities they are all still valid. The book is thoughtfully written and educates children and adults alike about various gender identities and what they mean. The book also includes resources at the end of the book for both children and parents to learn more about gender identity. The illustrations are colorful and beautifully complement the topic of the book. The book is illustrated by Noah Grigni who themselves is non-binary.

810WSYBncdLStonewall: A Building. An Uprising. A Revolution.
Rob Sanders
Illustrated by Jamey Christoph
Random House, April 23, 2019
Ages Pre K-10

The Stonewall Inn has changed over the course of the 20th and 21st century. In the 1960’s, the Stonewall Inn began to attract the LGBTQIA+ community. As the inn began to attract more and more LGBTQIA+ people, police officers began to raid the building and arrest people for being LGBTQIA+. On June 28, 1969, police once again raided the inn and began arresting people; only this time the people resisted beginning the Stonewall Uprising. Following the events of the Stonewall Uprising, each June people around the world celebrate LGBTQIA+ rights. Written from the perspective of the Stonewall Inn rather than those who participated in the Uprising, this book does a great job of simply explaining the events that led to the Stonewall Uprising. The illustrations are gorgeous and make the book come to life. Resources at the back of the book provide a more in depth history of the Stonewall Inn and the Stonewall Uprising, as well as books and websites to learn more.

911GEL0JZ1LBloom
Kevin Panetta and Savanna Ganucheau
Illustrated by Savanna Ganucheau
First Second, January 29, 2019
Ages 12 and up

Ari wants to move away to the city with his friends and bandmates, but is stuck at home working at his family’s bakery. Looking to find someone to take his place at the bakery, Ari meets Hector who is studying to be a baker. As Ari tries to find himself and move away, he realizes that Hector may be one good reason to stay. A sweet, slow-paced, graphic novel about falling in love and finding oneself. The illustrations are entirely in shades of blue, creating a calming atmosphere for the story. The end of the book included a recipe on how to make the Kyrkos Family Bakery’s Famous Sourdough Rolls, (which looks delicious).

51lH-OCV+oL._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgThe Weight of the Stars
K. Ancrum
Macmillian, March 19, 2019
Ages 13 and up

Since the death of her parents, Ryann has become the sole provider for her brother James and his son Charlie. With the weight of the responsibilities she now has, Ryann is forced to give up her dreams of going to space. When Ryann meets and befriends the Uninaut’s daughter Alexandria, her dreams of space re-awaken. As the two girls spend more time together, they begin to develop feelings for one another, which makes Ryann wonder, is going to space worth leaving Alexandria and her family behind? A poignant and nuanced book, it explores what it means to take care of others, and what it means to pursue your dreams knowing that those dreams may make it so that you can never see your loved ones again.

31681158._UY762_SS762_Starworld
Amy Coulthurst and Paula Garner
Candlewick Press, April 16, 2019
Ages 13 and up

Sam Jones is loves to draw, and dreams of becoming an aerospace engineer. Sam is nerdy and only has one friend, until the day Zoe Miller walks into her life. Sam and Zoe begin to text each other regularly about the world they created together—Starworld—where they can escape the problems that they face in their lives. As Starworld expands, so too do Sam’s feelings for Zoe. The only problem is that Zoe has a boyfriend. Written in the perspectives of both Zoe and Sam, this book shows that people’s lives are not always what we assume them to be and that the problems we face can be lessened with support.

 

41Lq87sSB7L._SX336_BO1,204,203,200_Carmilla: The Novel
Adapted by Kim Turrisi
KCP Loft, May 7, 2019
Ages 13 and up

Laura has just begun her freshman year at Silas University when her roommate Betty goes missing. When Laura goes looking for answers, she is met with hostility by the dean of the university. It seems as though no one will take this seriously. To make matters worse, her new roommate, Carmilla seems to be actively antagonizing Laura. Despite this, Laura finds herself inexplicably attracted to Carmilla. Could it be because Carmilla is a vampire? Could Carmilla be behind Betty’s disappearance? Based on the web series of the same name, Carmilla is a fun, fast-paced, vampire story.  While making references to other well-known vampire novels, this one still feels original and fresh.

41473872I Wish You All the Best
Mason Deaver
Scholastic, May 28, 2019
Ages 13 and up

Ben recently came out to their parents as non-binary and was kicked out of their house. Desperate, Ben calls their estranged sister Hannah for help. After moving in with Hannah and getting enrolled at North Wake high school, Ben meets Nathan. Nathan is beautiful, funny, and kind, and becomes one of Ben’s closest friends. Scared of being rejected by Nathan, Ben decides not to tell him that they are non-binary. Still dealing with the fallout of coming out to their parents, Ben begins to learn that not everyone will reject them due to their gender orientation. Written by Mason Deaver, who themselves is non-binary, this is a touching story about coming to terms with your gender identity.

My TBR List Celebrates APHM (Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month)

One benefit of a mile-long TBR list is that there is always a themed booklist hiding within. This month, as luck (and publishing trends) would have it, my list contains a lovely selection of titles in celebration of Asian/Pacific American Heritage month. As we honor Asians and Pacific Islanders in the US, this May, and celebrate the diverse traditions, tastes, and identities they represent, I can’t think of a better way to appreciate their varied experiences than through stories, can you?

Here’s what’s had me turning pages well into the night this month…

Ojiichan's Gift

Ojiichan’s Gift
Chieri Uegaki
Illustrated by Genevieve Simms
Kids Can Press, April 2019
Ages 5-8

Mayumi grows up and grows close to her grandfather as he teaches her to care for the garden he’s built her. But when her Ojiichan is no longer able to work in the garden, Mayumi must learn to accept the change in their relationship and give a gift of her own. Gentle and quiet, an explanation of aging and the changing relationships between grandparents and grandchildren.

Pie in the Sky by Remi Lai

Pie in the Sky
Remy Lai
Henry Holt, May 2019
Ages 8-11

Jingwen is struggling. Moving to Mars (aka Australia) is hard. Learning to speak English is hard. Making friends is hard. Losing his father is hard. But making cake is easy and making the cakes he made with his father seems to make the rest a bit easier too. The juxtaposition of prose and comic-style illustrations complement the honest mixing of humor and grief in Jingwen’s world.

I Love You So Mochi by Sarah Kuhn

I Love You So Mochi
Sarah Kuhn
Scholastic, May 2019
Ages 14-17

Fleeing a fight with her mother over her future plans, Kimi Nakamura impulsively accepts an invitation to spend spring break in Kyoto, Japan with the grandparents she’s never met. But her journey of self-discovery takes a turn for the romantic when a cute boy (dressed as a mochi) volunteers to help her figure out what she’s meant to do. As they explore the sights in Kyoto, Kimi comes to value her true artistic vision, her budding relationships with Akira and her grandparents, and her mother’s concern for her future. Adventure, flirtation, and delicious treats on the path to enlightenment.

The Beauty of The Moment by Tanaz Bhathena

The Beauty of the Moment
Tanaz Bhathena
MacMillan, February 2019
Ages 14-17

Susan is a recent transplant from India to Canada, by way of Saudi Arabia—book-smart, artistic, and driven by a desire not to disappoint her parents. Malcolm was born and raised in Canada by an angry father and deceased mother—street-smart, hurting, and trying to figure it all out. As their relationship evolves (and devolves) and each deals with their own family struggles, they will learn how to be friends and to be themselves. Full of all the heartaches, headaches, and struggles of growing up, with just enough humor to balance the weight.

And a summer publication worth waiting for…

The Downstairs Girl by Stacey Lee

The Downstairs Girl
Stacey Lee
Penguin Teen/Putnam, August 2019
Ages 14-17

Orphan, turned hat designer, turned ladies maid, turned secret advice columnists, Jo Kuan is used to blending into the background as a form of self-preservation. But now her unconventional advice about challenging societal norms in 1890s Atlanta and a desire to challenge her own family’s troubled history, may just be the things that push her into the spotlight. A thoughtful commentary on race, gender, and being true to one’s self.

 

Sharks Find Their Way Home: A Review of The Line Tender

the line tenderThe Line Tender
By Kate Allen, Illustrated by Xingye Jin
Penguin
April 2019
Grades: 5 and up

 Lucy and Fred are lifelong friends, and as they work on their animal field guide over the summer, it looks like they may become something more. When local fisherman and family friend Sookie catches a great white shark, Fred and Lucy set out to learn more about great white sharks by reading an old research proposal written by Lucy’s mother—an accomplished shark biologist before her untimely death when Lucy was 7 years old. Tragedy strikes when, after sharing her first kiss with Fred, he drowns in a quarry accident. Lucy is then left trying to find meaning in her friendship to Fred and wondering what could have been, while still struggling with the grief of her mother’s passing. By dedicating herself to her mother’s shark research and Fred’s field guide, and with the help of her Father, Sookie, and neighbor Mr. Patterson, Lucy is eventually able to come to terms with the deaths of her mother and Fred.
The Line Tender by Kate Allen is an emotional coming-of-age story that follows Lucy Everhart as she grapples with the loss of her mother and her best friend Fred. Allen thoughtfully ties Lucy’s attempts to find meaning in her friendship with Fred to her attempts to better understand the sharks her mother and Fred loved so much. The Line Tender is beautifully written and is both heartfelt and heartbreaking in the ways that it deals with community, friendship, and tragedy. Xingye Jin’s shark illustrations for each chapter title are stunning, adding yet another layer to the book as it shows Lucy slowly learning how to draw sharks as she learns more about them.

ALA Recap (a bit behind schedule)

I’m back from a lovely extended visit to the Gulf Coast, first to ALA Annual in New Orleans then some vacation time in the Florida Panhandle! Amazing and rejuvenating all the way around.

NOLA sign

I promised a quick recap when I returned, so here are some of the highlights:

The Opening Session with Michelle Obama was awesome! She was warm, funny, and inspired a great conversation about work/life balance and the importance of building a supportive community for yourself. Excited for her upcoming memoir Becoming (Penguin, 2018) to hit stores in November.michelle-obama.jpg

 

jason reynolds

I was this close (HA!) to Jason Reynolds.

Had an amazing morning at the Coretta Scott King book awards breakfast. The award and honor book winners were as eloquent as expected, but surprised me with their humility and respect for their readers. I was also fortunate to find myself at a table full of smart and resourceful women who reminded me why I love librarians so much!

emilio estevez

 

I was convinced (without much arm-twisting) to abandon my plans for a couple hours to attend a screening of The Public (which will come out this fall) and a Q & A with the movie’s writer/director/star Emilio Estevez and Ryan Dowd, author of The Librarian’s Guide to Homelessness (ALA, 2018). The movie was both heartwarming and heartbreaking– I highly recommend!

brangwain spurge

Was so lucky to be invited to lunch with M.T Anderson and Eugene Yelchin to discuss their new book The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge (Candlewick, 2018). Eugene and Tobin were smart and charming, and lunch was delicious— I couldn’t ask for more! The book is next up on my to-be-read list and with its elfin historian and goblin archivist promises to be as delightful as lunch!

And no New Orleans recap would be complete without a restaurant recommendation, so if you find yourself near the NOLA convention center, might I suggest:milkshake

  • Cochon Butcher—The roast beef sandwich was perfect and marinated brussels sprouts—WOW!
  • Auction House Market—This entire place is cool, but I highly recommend the vegan mint and brownie milkshake at Mac & Moon, it’s extra cool (and sweet)!

 

 

 

2018 Picture Book Poetry

April is National Poetry Month – celebrate with us by checking out new collections and illustrated poems. You can find these titles, novels in verse for older readers, and other lyrical picture books for children here at Butler Children’s Literature Center!

blackgirlmagic

Black Girl Magic (Macmillan/Roaring Brook Press, January 2018)
Written by Mahogany Browne
Illustrated by Jess X. Snow

With a dedication stating “This book is for you,” this spirited poem of strength and finding beauty in yourself despite what the world expects of you lifts up black women, acknowledging their accomplishments and struggles, and gives young black girls an anthem of support. The text is accompanied by striking black, white, and red illustrations that amplify the empowering message of the poem.

 

In the Past (Candlewick Press, March 2018)
inthepastWritten by David Elliott
Illustrated by Matthew Trueman

This collection of poems about ancient creatures ranges from the humble Trilobite to the mighty Quetzacoatlus and proves that anything can be poetic. Perfect for dinosaur fans of any age, In the Past includes a geologic timeline and notes for each ancient creature along with realistic mixed media images. The poetry is light-hearted and informative and plays on the illustrations on each page.

 

martinrisingMartin Rising: Requiem for a King (Scholastic Press, January 2018)
Written by Andrea Davis Pinkney
Illustrated by Brian Pinkney

In this collection of “docu-poems,” author Andrea Davis Pinkney presents the final months of Dr. King’s life. With a musicality of language and along with Brian Pinkney’s illuminating and spiritual paintings, each poem carries a different emotional tone and honors multiple facets of King’s life – his work, his family, and his ministry. This selection works on its own as a memorial of Dr. King’s life, but would also be a powerful read aloud in a classroom or theater setting, or as a part of a larger program for students at any age.

 

The Horse’s Haiku (Candlewick Press, March 2018)horseshaiku
Written by Michael J. Rosen
Illustrated by Stan Fellows

This collection of haiku about horses is organized into three sections: In the Field, At the Barn, and Under Saddle. Watercolor illustrations on each page allow the reader’s eye to graze while the mind contemplates the sparse verse. A note on haiku concludes the collection and teaches the reader how to enjoy haiku in everyday life. The Horse’s Haiku would be suitable for a read aloud for younger children, or as a read along as part of a larger poetry unit for older elementary students.

 

withmyhandsWith My Hands: Poems About Making Things (HMH/Clarion Books, March 2018)
Written by Amy Ludwig VanDerwater
Illustrated by Lou Fancher & Steve Johnson

This collection celebrates the “joy of making” with over 20 poems about different creative activities, each written in unique styles. The illustrations are also varied, ranging from crayon and colored pencil sketches to mixed media collages and paintings. With My Hands would pair well with an arts and crafts session, or as inspiration for creative pursuits of all types.

 

Earth Verse: Haiku from the Ground Up (Candlewick Press, February 2018)earthverse
Written by Sally M. Walker
Illustrated by William Grill

Geographical concepts and natural events like minerals, fossils, earthquakes, and volcanoes are explored in this collection of haiku, accompanied by impressionistic and muted colored pencil illustrations. Each concept is explained in further detail at the end of the book, and a suggested reading list is also included, making this a perfect poetic tie-in or an added “layer” of a geology curriculum.

 

didyouhear

Did You Hear What I Heard? Poems About School (Penguin Random House/Dial Books, February 2018)
Written by Kay Winters
Illustrated by Patrice Barton

Over 30 poems fill this colorful collection – all about bus rides, fire drills, recess, field trips, tests, and teachers. Stylistically, the poems range from structured stanzas to free verse to singsong rhymes. Bright and playful illustrations make this collection suitable for younger students and perfect for classroom read-alouds or as a starting point for students to write their own school-themed poems.