Butler Bookshelf

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A trio of newly released titles awaits us – particularly Nadine Jolie Courtney’s novel All-American Muslim Girl.

Charlie Hernández & the Castle of Bones
Written by Ryan Calejo
Published by Aladdin
Available today!

Pluto Gets the Call
Written by Adam Rex and illustrated by Laurie Keller
Published by Beach Lane Books
Available today!

All-American Muslim Girl
Written by Nadine Jolie Courtney
Published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux for Young Readers
Available today!

 

Butler Bookshelf

Just a handful of books in this week – lucky for us, it included a great mix of nonfiction, picture books, and a work of teen fiction. All titles are available as of today!

Winterwood
Written by Shea Ernshaw
Published by Simon Pulse
Available today!

P is for Poppadoms! An Indian Alphabet Book
Written by Kabir Sehgal and Surishtha Sehgal, illustrated by Hazel Ito
Published by Beach Lane Books
Available today!

The Fierce 44: Black Americans Who Shook Up The World
Written by the staff of the Undefeated, portraits by Robert Ball
Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Available today!

Go, Girls, Go!
Written by Frances Gilbert, illustrated by Allison Black
Published by Beach Lane Books
Available today!

Butler Bookshelf

It may be Halloween week, but there are no tricks on our shelves–only treats! Each of these books is out today. We’re looking forward to Eva Chen’s latest Juno Valentine picture book!

Girls Like Us
Written by Randi Pink
Published by Feiwel and Friends
Available today!

Beyond the Black Door
Written by A.M. Strickland
Published by Imprint
Available today!

Open Borders: The Science and Ethics of Immigration
Written by Bryan Caplan and illustrated by Zach Weinersmith
Published by First Second
Available today!

Juno Valentine and the Fantastic Fashion Adventure
Written by Eva Chen and illustrated by Derek Deseierto
Published by Feiwel and Friends
Available today!

Red Rover: Curiosity on Mars
Written by Richard Ho and illustrated by Katherine Roy
Published by Roaring Brook
Available today!

Fear Of The Unknown: A Review of How We Became Wicked

How We Became Wicked
By Alexander Yates
Atheneum
July 23rd, 2019
Grades 8 and above

Several decades have passed since the outbreak of a virus know as “wicked” which has devastated the world, leaving few survivors. Contracted from mosquito like bugs known as “singers”, the “wicked” turns people into homicidal maniacs. The town of Goldsport has built a glass dome around their community to prevent singers from entering and spreading the “wicked”. Astrid, the only person in the town who is immune to the singers, is desperate to leave Goldsport and go to Puffin Island where a mysterious lighthouse shines. Yet, every time she brings up the lighthouse or the island, the people in her town dismiss her, clearly trying to hide something. Meanwhile, on Puffin Island, Natalie and her family struggle to survive with their dwindling resources and constant vigilance of her “wicked” grandfather. When her mother gives birth, Natalie must go to the mainland by herself to try to get her sister “vexed” a type of immunization that would make her newborn sister immune to the “singers”. While on the mainland she meets other people for the first time in her life, people who seem a little too fascinated by her purple glowing “vexed” eyes. Told through intersecting adventures, both girls eventually learn that ordinary people can be just as wicked as the “wicked”; they can even be worse.
Yates creates a world that is constantly teetering on the brink of collapse, where the slightest push could destroy everything. This book grapples with questions of morality, asking who gets to decide who survives? Is survival worth letting others die? A gripping book from front to cover, this book is perfect for the spooky season.

Butler Bookshelf

We’re so excited about this week’s batch of new books, including Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story. A fry bread recipe comes at the end of this warm picture book–as well as an author’s note that provides history to this lyrical work.

Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story
Written by Kevin Noble Maillard and illustrated by Juana Martinez-Neal
Published by Roaring Brook Press
Available now

Our Wayward Fate
Written by Gloria Chao
Published by Simon Pulse
Available now

Light It Up
Written by Kekla Magoon
Published by Henry Holt
Available now

From A Small Seed – The Story of Eliza Hamilton
Written by Camille Andros and illustrated by Tessa Blackham
Published by Holt Books for Young Readers
Available now

Infinite Hope: A Black Artist’s Journey from World War II to Peace
Written and illustrated by Ashley Bryan
Published by Atheneum
Available now

My Love Language is Snack Food: A Review of Permanent Record

Permanent Record
Written by Mary H. K. Choi
Published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Ages: 14+
Published: September 3, 2019

Nineteen-year-old Pablo Neruda Rind is a lot of things: snack food aficionado, NYU dropout, and deeply in debt. He’s working the night shift at a bodega when the stars align (or the pop stars align): superstar Leanna Smart comes in, picks out snacks, and sparks fly. Soon Pablo has two separate lives: the jet-setter life with Leanna and the one he’s avoiding back home. But you can only avoid debt collectors, parents, and roommates for so long.

Is this a love story? No. This is the story of a 19-year-old who simply cannot get it together. Pablo is whip-smart and talented and absolutely maddening. Why? Because author Mary H. K. Choi captures the haziness and frustration of almost-adulthood with perfect pitch. The romance between Pablo and Leanna isn’t that far-fetched on paper—her megastar life is paparazzi-ridden and exhausting, his life is debt-ridden and tiring.  This romance lets them both disconnect from what drains them. The difference is that Leanna is committed to her popstar life, whereas Pablo wants to check out of his. Which he does. It is not an easy feat, because, for all its complications, Pablo’s life is filled with people who love him. Watching him blow off his little brother or screen his mom’s calls aren’t easy for the reader. But it is possible for Pablo because he’s got his own script: his single mom is wedded to her work, she won’t even take them to Korea to visit their family; his dad is no role model, a Princeton engineer who now dabbles in playwriting? Please. And his little brother? Well, if his little brother knew about Leanna Smart, he would understand. The thing is, Pablo’s family and friends—heck, even his bosses at the bodega!—they do understand. But Pablo doesn’t hear it. At least, he doesn’t hear it, until finally, finally he does.

This is an excellent read for anyone who doesn’t know what they want to be when they grow up.

Spooky Stories If You Dare!

This fall season, Butler Center turns its attention to the things that go bump in the night. Ghosts, goblins, and the neighbors next door. We’ve handpicked some spooky tales for all ages and all scaredy-cat levels. We rated the books on a zero to five pumpkin scale (zero pumpkins means not scary at all; five pumpkins means prepare for the fright of your life). Grab some hot cider and settle down with one of our picks!

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Click, Clack, Boo! A Tricky Treat
Written by Doreen Cronin and illustrated by Betsy Lewin
Published by Little Simon
Age range: 0-3 years
Available now
This board book has plenty of sound effects and emotive illustrations. This lighthearted Halloween tale is not scary, except for one mysterious and spooky character wearing a cape.
Scary Rating: Half a pumpkin out of five pumpkins

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Pick a Pumpkin
Written by Patricia Toht and illustrated by Jarvis
Published by Candlewick
Age range: 3-8 years
Available now
This picture book is saturated with sunset colors and family outings. Not at all frightening, this is the book to read to get children in the mood for fall.
Scary Rating: zero pumpkins out of five pumpkins 

The Forgotten Girl.jpgThe Forgotten Girl
Written by India Hill Brown
Published by Scholastic Press
Ages 8-12 years
Available November 5, 2019
The Forgotten Girl is a tale about the ghosts of segregation and racism. When Iris happens upon an unmarked grave during the first snowfall of the season—her curiosity is sparked, but so is her imagination. Real-life ghosts and family peril are supplemented by disturbing historical accuracies. This book is not lighthearted, but it is meaningful and scary all at the same time.
Scary Rating: 4 pumpkins out of 5 pumpkins 

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Guest: A Changeling Tale
Written by Mary Downing Hahn
Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Ages 8-12 years
Available now
Veteran scary storyteller Mary Downing Hahn elicits frights and dread with her folkloric tale of switched infant boys. Mollie sings praises on her beautiful baby brother Thomas, a mistake if the Kinde Folke hear, which they do and soon enough her brother is stolen and replaced by a changeling child from another world. As Mollie and her family turn on this changeling, Mollie vows to return this “guest” and get her brother back. An eerie atmospheric tale, you can feel the fog and dread seep into your bones as Mollie traverses to the deep, deep wood. The cruelty in the book is not terrifying, but it is unsettling. This is a spooky book well-suited for reading under blankets.
Scary Rating: 3 pumpkins out of 5 pumpkins 

Scary Stories for Young Foxes.jpgScary Stories for Young Foxes
Written by Christian McKay Heidicker and illustrated by Junyi Wu
Published by MacMillan/Henry Holt
Ages 8-12 years
This story-within-a-story is downright frightening. Family loss, turmoil, gore, with the backdrop of survival of the fittest make for a thrilling read. Young readers will grapple with death and consequences, but the affection throughout makes it downright endearing, too. This is a tale that begs to be read aloud.
Scary Rating: 3 pumpkins out of 5 pumpkins 

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The Okay Witch
Written and illustrated by Emma Steinkellner
Published by Aladdin
Age Range: 10-14 years
Available now
The Okay Witch is a fast-paced adventure that summons generational legacies and hurtful histories. Moth Hush takes on a lot for a thirteen year old: bullying at school, a complicated family life, and new witching abilities. Witch-hunting and execution are balanced by a charming cat and a budding friendship.
Scary Rating: 1 pumpkin out of 5 pumpkins 

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Life Is Short and Then You Die: Mystery Writers of America Presents First Encounters with Murder
Edited by Kelley Armstrong
Published by Imprint
Ages 14+ years
What makes this collection of short stories so eerie is that many of these stories are too relatable— online message board run amok and the danger of “nice guys” to name a few.  This anthology blends contemporary fare with a few historical stories with very little paranormal activity. The collection’s main focus is the horror of the everyday. Teens can browse around to find stories that suit their mood.
Scary Rating: 4.5 pumpkins out of 5 pumpkins