Butler Youth Services Scholarship

book shelves Pexels

Are you interested in becoming part of a diverse and engaged youth-services-focused library community?

This $15,000 scholarship will be awarded
to a student seeking to earn an MLIS with a planned focus on
service to children and young adults.

The Butler Children’s Literature Center is proud to announce the creation of a new scholarship to support diversity in library service to young people.

Preference for the Butler Youth Services Scholarship will be given to graduates of a Dominican University undergraduate program who are from a background underrepresented in the field of library science. This competitive award will consider need, merit, academic excellence, and leadership qualities as part of the applicant selection process.

Butler Scholars Will:

  • complete the master’s degree in library and information science from Dominican University’s SOIS program within two calendar years of continuing enrollment
  • work closely with academic advisors on course selections with the goal of completing a Certificate in Youth Services or school library licensure as part of their degree
  • participate in a variety of Butler Center activities including the annual Butler Lecture, Book Sale, and continuing education events
  • produce a relevant project or complete an independent study using BCLC resources to be presented at a BCLC event and/or a state or national professional conference

For full eligibility and application requirements visit
dom.edu/butler-youth-services-scholarship
or
Contact Jen Clemons, Curator, Butler Children’s Literature Center
jclemons@dom.edu | 708-524-6861

Digital Love: A Review of No One Here Is Lonely

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No One Here Is Lonely
By Sarah Everett
Knopf Books
February 5, 2019
Grades: 9 and up

No One Here Is Lonely follows high-school senior Eden as she navigates grief, loss, and change. Eden’s best friend Lacey has abandoned her for new friends. Eden’s family dynamics are shifting as well: she discovers that her mom has been cheating on her dad, and this changes her perspective on her parents and on love. In the midst of all this change, Eden takes comfort in speaking to a computer-simulated version of her crush, Will, who died earlier in the school year. She starts a new job at the grocery store, where she makes new friends and becomes closer with Oliver, Lacey’s twin brother. Ultimately, Eden decides that must let go of Will, that she can date Oliver, and, most importantly, that she can make decisions for herself. The story is told from Eden’s perspective, which allows the reader to feel sympathy for her as she processes her feelings of angst and uncertainty. These feelings might resonate with a teenage audience, especially readers who are facing the transition from high school to college and, like Eden, are unsure about what the future holds. When asked about her future plans, Eden is relieved to know that “it’s okay to be lost, that’s okay to not have [her] life plotted out, not to know what [she] love[s] or want[s]. It’s enough to simply be on the way to figuring it out” (209). As the book progresses, Eden develops the confidence to embrace this instability. Despite the book having romantic undertones, it is really about Eden’s self-discovery.

Finding Balance: Self-care for You and Your Team

As librarians and teachers serving youth, it’s in our jobs and in our natures to care for the kids in our communities. But how do we do that without burn-out and compassion fatigue? How do we stay at our best to give our best?

Join Regina Townsend, from the Forest Park Public Library, to discuss self-care strategies for individuals and organizations and ways you can create a culture of mental health in your library.

When: Saturday May 11, 2019 from 1pm-3pm

Where: Butler Children’s Literature Center–Dominican University–Crown 214

RSVP to butler@dom.edu to reserve your seat

 

 

A New Bird Joins the Nest–Kokila, the new Imprint from Penguin

Kokila Imprint Logo

Penguin has announced a new Imprint, Kokila which aims to bring together authors, illustrators, publishing professionals, and readers, from inclusive communities to share and celebrate stories that reflect the richness of the world. Kokila is the Sanskrit name for the koel bird, often found in the Indian subcontinent, China, and Southeast Asia. The koel bird is said to be the harbringer of new beginnings; just as Kokila is a new beginning for readers, creators, and publishers alike.

Namratha Tripathi, vice president and Publisher of Kokila, writes that, “[Kokila] was born out of the optimism and frustration I felt about the conversations around diversity and representation in children’s literature, My hope was to create an imprint where we could holistically address the three major ways in which we talk about diversity in our field 1) on the page, 2) in the creators, and 3) in the gatekeepers and staff”.

Kokila will publish works for children and young adults in a variety of formats an genres. Some of the books set to be released from Kokila includes Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry, illustrated by Vashti Harrison, My Papi has a Motorcycle by Isabel Quintero, illustrated by Zeke Peña, Patron Saints of Nothing by Randy Ribay, Each Tiny Spark by Pablo Cartaya, among many other books.

A Burning Sky of Pain–A Review of The Weight of our Sky

the weight of our sky

The Weight of Our Sky
By Hanna Alkaf
Simon & Schuster
February 5, 2019
Grades:  9 and up

Melati Ahmad is a sixteen-year-old Malaysian girl of Malay descent who suffers from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)—however, Melati believes that her OCD is actually the work of a djinn. Since the death of her father, Melati’s greatest fear has been the death of her mother. She counts by threes—her compulsive behavior—to appease the djinn and save her mother, along with everyone else she loves, from dying. On May 13, 1969, Melati is thrown into a world of chaos when the race riots between the Chinese and Malays begin. While at the movies with her best friend Saf, men with weapons break into the theater. Although Melati is saved by a Chinese-Malaysian stranger, she is forced to leave Saf behind if she wants to survive. Overcome with guilt, Mel teams up with Auntie Bee’s son Vince to try and find her mother who see she has not seen since the beginning of the riots. Melati is forced to confront her djinn and find her inner strength in order to stand up for what she believes in, find her mother, and protect the people she loves.

Alkaf is unafraid to make a book that is completely and utterly of her homeland. Alkaf’s note at the beginning of the book is spot on, letting readers know of the many possible triggers within the book and lets readers know that it is okay if they are not ready to read the book at this time. This is a powerful and brutally honest book that provides a very real look at what OCD looks like in a high-stress situation, which help builds the tension within the book.  It is thoughtfully and beautifully written, vividly capturing a time of terror from the eyes of a teenaged girl who just wants her mother.

Headed to IYSI?

Will you be at the Illinois Youth Services Institute next week?
We will – lets chat!

IYSS_Logo

You can find the Butler Center at Booth #3 in Redbird CD during the following exhibit hours:

Sponsor Exhibit Hours
Thursday, March 21
6:30 – 8:30 p.m.                Sponsor Exhibit Reception
Friday, March 22
8:00 – 10:00 a.m.              Sponsor Exhibits Coffee
10:00 – 12:30 p.m.            Concurrent Sponsor Exhibits

Stop by for a chat and a chance to win a signed book from an Illinois author!  

Haven’t registered for IYSI yet? Find out more at ILA

CommUnity Building
Illinois Youth Services Institute
March 21-22, 2019
Marriott Bloomington-Normal Hotel & Conference Center

 

Here to Save the Day: A Review of The Last Last-Day-of-Summer

The Last Last-Day-of-Summer cover imageThe Last Last-Day-of-Summer
Lamar Giles, illustrated by Dapo Adeola
Versify, April 2019
Grade 5-7

The Last Last Day of Summer, by Lamar Giles, introduces us to two lovable cousins, Sheed and Otto, aka the Legendary Alston Boys of Logan County, a magical place where banshees, monsters, and robots need managing—managing the boys are happy to provide. Indeed, the boys’ long history of town-saving adventures shines through the pages. It may be our first time joining Otto and Sheed, but they’re old pros at saving the day. Only the twin sisters, the Epic Ellison’s, give these two brave, clever boys a run for the money … or, rather, a run for the keys to the city. When the last day of summer starts with a headline, informing Sheed and Ollie that the Ellison girls have earned a third key to the city—one more than the boys have—the Alston boys are determined to catch up. It doesn’t take long for them to run into a mysterious stranger with a curious camera. A click and a clack later, Logan County is frozen in time, leaving only the boys and a bevy of unexpected visitors to figure out how to reverse the damage and free the town and its zany cast of character. The story is deeply grounded in family and gently explores themes such as loss and fear, confidence and insecurity, and the ups and downs of friendship. In the end, our imaginative heroes must work through their differences; think creatively about which moves from their long list of Maneuvers will help them solve their pile of problems; and tap strange people, unexpected creatures, and even a few frenemies to unfreeze Logan County.

Many thanks to local author, SCBWI-IL member, and guest reviewer, Malayna Evans. Malayna has used her Ph.D. in ancient Egyptian history from the University of Chicago to write a three book series featuring two South Side Chicago siblings stuck in ancient Egypt. Her debut novel, JAGGER JONES & THE MUMMY’S ANKH, will be released in spring of 2019. She lives in Oak Park with her two kids, a rescue dog, and a hamster. You can learn more about Malayna and her work here, http://malaynaevans.com , or follow her on Twitter, https://twitter.com/Malayna , or Instagram, https://www.instagram.com/malaynaevans/.