Butler Bookshelf

Some new titles we’re eager to read!

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Slay
Written by Brittney Morria
Published by Simon Pulse
Available now

What Makes Us
Written by Raffi Mittlefehldt
Published by Candlewick
Available October 15, 2019

The Tornado
Written by Jake Burt
Published by Macmillan / Feiwel and Friends
Available now

The Vanderbeekers to the Rescue
by Karina Yan Glaer
Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Available now

Maybe He Just Likes You
Written by Barbara  Dee
Published by Aladdin
Available October 22, 2019

Cursed
Written by Thomas Wheeler and illustrated by Frank Miller
Published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Available now

Amy Wu and the Perfect Bao
Written by Kat Zhang and illustrated by Charlene Chua
Published by Aladdin
Available now

Roses Have Thorns: A Review of Girl’s With Sharp Sticks

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Girl’s With Sharp Sticks
By Suzanne Young
Simon Pulse
March 19, 2019
Grades 9 and up

Welcome, investors, to Innovations Academy. Here girls are created and controlled to be perfect. Although there are problems with Philomena Rhodes. She has been acting up despite her impulse behavior therapy. Philomena has recently become distraught because her friend, Lennon Rose, has gone missing. Lennon Rose had been reading poems that encouraged ideas. She began to question the school’s teachings, and it started affecting the other girls: Sydney, Annalise, Brynn, and Marcella. No longer willing to be brainwashed by the men, they escape the dreaded school with the help of their new friends, Jackson and Quentin. Now, they’re on they are on their way to uncover the mysteries at Innovations Corporation. This dystopian nightmare of a novel is the first book in Suzanne Young’s Girls with Sharp Sticks series. Young takes her time to show the disturbing world that these girls live in. The men in the novel are possessive, dominating, and obsessed with the girls. Controlling what they wear, eat, and learn. Women’s rights are being taken away, and the girls discover that what these teachers, administrators, and investors are doing is wrong. The tone is creepy and unnerving. However, the book is empowering, especially in terms of sisterhood. Young writes, “They manipulate us with lollipops and guilt…and now, we can choose to be better than these men. We choose to love each other. We choose to be free” (278/353). The girls have a strong connection that is constant throughout the book. It’s not one girl fighting to escape; it’s all of these girls who  have formed a bond. A good addition to any library because it deals with fundamental human rights and why we need them.