Breakdown of Diverse Content & Own Voices works within Butler’s 2018 Collection

Introduction:
Inspired by We Need Diverse Books and the University of Wisconsin-Madison info-graphic breaking down the percentage of books depicting diverse characters (specifically race and ethnicity) we here at Butler decided to evaluate our 2018 collection to determine whether or not we had a similar breakdown. Questions that we hope to answer by looking back at our 2018 titles included: Does our collection accurately represent what’s being published? Do we need to do some active curation to give our users a better picture of current publishing trends? Although we realize that we receive much fewer books in one year than either of this two institutions do, we felt that is our responsibility to ensure that our collection was an accurate reflection of what is published in a given year. 

WNDB 2018 Graphic

We Need Diverse Books & CCBC Diversity info-graphic

Method & Results:
1. Gather all 2018 titles Butler received and put it into an excel doc. Delete any and all duplicate titles within the excel doc. This was done by putting the doc in alphabetical order by author to make it easier to spot any duplicates.
2. We then looked up each book on Kirkus and Amazon to determine the race/ethnicity of the protagonists of each book. Once this was determined, this would be indicated on the excel doc with the following acronyms:

  • African/African American (A/AA)
  • American Indian/First Nations (AI/FN)
  • Asian Pacific Islander/Asian Pacific American (API/APA)
  • Latinx
  • White

In the case that it was none of the above, we left it blank to represent animals/other.
3. After determining the contents diversity, we then went on to look up the author and illustrator of the title to determine whether or not the title was own voices. If it was own voices, an ‘x’ was put in the excel doc. If the title was not own voices, this would be indicated in the excel doc by writing the race/ethnicity of the author and illustrator next to one of the above acronyms.
4. After all this was done, we found that we had a few anthology titles that included both diverse characters and none diverse characters. Since we could not determine how much of these titles were dedicated to either non diverse or diverse characters we decided to delete these titles from the doc so as not to misrepresent them in our graphic.
5. We then organized the doc in alphabetical order based off our acronyms. From there we counted how many books we had in all of our categories—including those we had left blank that represented books about animals or other inanimate objects. For each category we had the following amount of books:

BCLC 2018 All Books graph6. With these numbers in mind, we decided to focus on the 240 books that had diverse content to see how many were own voices.
7. We counted how many ‘x’ indicators we had in our A/AA, AI/FN, API/APA, and Latinx categories to see how many titles we had that were actually own voices.
We found that altogether there were only 119 titles that were on voices.
Once all the data had been gathered we made a graph breaking down all the books by      content and a graph that broke down the number of own voices titles by race/ethnicity.BCLC 2018 Only Diverse Content.png

  • Notably, we found that although the graph based off content indicated that of the 1420 we had only 0.42% was AI/FN content. The own voices graph, on the other-hand, indicated that of the 240 books we had with diverse characters 2% of own voices content was AI/FN.
  • In fact, the percentages for each category doubled between graphs. However, the overall percentage of non-own voices content made up 50% of the second graph while no individual category went above 19%.
  • Overall, own voices content only made up 8% of the total number of books that we received in 2018.BCLC 2018 Own Voices Overall

Breaking this down further, looking at each A/AA, AI/FN, API/APA, and Latinx individually to see what percentage of the content about them was own voices, we found that although A/AA had the most content its overall percentage of own voices titles was the lowest of all the other categories at 41%. Meanwhile Latinx, which had the second lowest amount of content had the highest percentage of own voice titles at 68%.  BCLC 2018 Own Voices within each race ethnicity

Conclusions:
The percentages of our content graph are overall lower than those found by We Need Diverse Books (WNDB) and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. However, the one area where we had a higher percentage than WNDB and University of Wisconsin-Madison was in our other/animal category. This may in part be due to the fact that we included self-help and how-to books within this category. Without knowing exactly how WNDB and University Wisconsin-Madison determined what went into this category it is hard to say why this discrepancy exists.
On the whole, our results seemed to match the same pattern as WNDB and the University of Wisconsin with White making up the majority of content, followed by Animal/Other, A/AA, API/APA, Latinx, and AI/FN at the bottom. While the gap between diverse and not diverse content is great, the gap between own voices content and non-own voices content is even greater still.

Nature Children Atlantic

The Atlantic, Ashley Fetters

Final Thoughts:
As more diverse titles are published, it is important that they are predominantly written by people from the community they are writing about. It is not enough to have a diverse cast of characters if they do not act or accurately reflect the community they are meant to represent. At the very least, writers and illustrators should make sure that whatever they are producing does not further advance negative stereotypes of their subjects. People are not always aware of the biases they may hold; it is always a good idea to have a sensitivity reader look over and reevaluate your work so as not to further any biases that may be present.
These findings, as well as the findings by WNDB and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, may be helpful to librarians, educators, and parents when curating their own collections. Knowing that publishers mostly publish content depicting white children or animals, librarians, educators, and parents can take the appropriate steps to ensure that their collections are representative of the diverse communities of people which they serve. It is important that everyone feels heard and represented, and making sure that the books we select accurately reflect these voices is critical to expanding children’s world views and validating their self-worth.

 

 

 

Uniquely You: A Book Review of You Are Enough: Your Guide to Body Image and Eating Disorder Recovery by Jen Petro-Roy

you are enough image

You Are Enough: Your Guide to Body Image and Eating Disorder Recovery
By Jen Petro-Roy
February 19, 2019
Grades 6 and up

You Are Enough is a guide for young people struggling with eating disordered behavior and provides helpful resources, exercises, and information for readers to try and work towards recovery. Jen Petro-Roy writes about her own experiences of eating disordered behavior as well as her attempts at recovery, showing readers that they are not alone in their fight against their eating disorders. The book provides a list of resources on its last pages, spanning from where to get scholarships for treatment, body positive Instagram accounts, books, and websites dedicated to helping those with eating disordered behaviors. The book speaks at length about the need to find comfort in one’s self, rather than trying to make yourself likable to others. Attempts to control how others perceive you through eating disordered behavior will only serve to make you unhappier. By accepting yourself for who you are, and taking pride in what makes you unique, you can start the long and hard road to recovery.

You Are Enough is a non-fiction companion piece to Jen Petro-Roy’s fiction novel, Good Enough, about a young girl with an eating disorder. You Are Enough can be read as a standalone work without Good Enough. While the bulk of the work is meant for those already suffering from eating disordered behavior, it can be used and read by anyone. The book makes a point of showing that the world we live in inundates us with messages of self-worth being tied to self-image and how harmful it can be for our mental health.  This a fantastic book for anyone wanting to better improve their relationship with their own self-image.

Butler Youth Services Scholarship

book shelves Pexels

Are you interested in becoming part of a diverse and engaged youth-services-focused library community?

This $15,000 scholarship will be awarded
to a student seeking to earn an MLIS with a planned focus on
service to children and young adults.

The Butler Children’s Literature Center is proud to announce the creation of a new scholarship to support diversity in library service to young people.

Preference for the Butler Youth Services Scholarship will be given to graduates of a Dominican University undergraduate program who are from a background underrepresented in the field of library science. This competitive award will consider need, merit, academic excellence, and leadership qualities as part of the applicant selection process.

Butler Scholars Will:

  • complete the master’s degree in library and information science from Dominican University’s SOIS program within two calendar years of continuing enrollment
  • work closely with academic advisors on course selections with the goal of completing a Certificate in Youth Services or school library licensure as part of their degree
  • participate in a variety of Butler Center activities including the annual Butler Lecture, Book Sale, and continuing education events
  • produce a relevant project or complete an independent study using BCLC resources to be presented at a BCLC event and/or a state or national professional conference

For full eligibility and application requirements visit
dom.edu/butler-youth-services-scholarship
or
Contact Jen Clemons, Curator, Butler Children’s Literature Center
jclemons@dom.edu | 708-524-6861

Announcing “Read Local”

As promised in our “Made in Illinois” post, we’d like to share updated information about SCBWI’s Read Local website and resource for anyone looking to collaborate with authors and illustrators from Illinois. Here is their launch video:

We invite local librarians and educators to use Read Local in their programming and instruction, and don’t forget to visit Butler Children’s Literature Center to see what’s new in board books, picture books, nonfiction, early readers and chapter books, middle grade fiction, and young adult fiction! We are open Monday-Thursday from 12-4 pm, or by appointment (email butler@dom.edu).

Happy collaborating!